Surveillance

The FBI Is Locating Cars By Spying On Their WiFi

The FBI is using a controversial technology traditionally used to locate smartphones as a car tracking surveillance tool that spies on vehicles’ on-board WiFi. Known as a Stingray or a cell-site simulator, the tool masquerades as a cell tower in order to force all devices in a given area to connect into it. Agents can then pick the number they’re interested in and locate the device. Normally that would be a mobile phone, but a search warrant application discovered by Forbes shows it can also be used to find vehicles, as long as they have onboard Wi-Fi.

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Police turn to car data to destroy suspects' alibis

They reveal everything from location, speed and acceleration to when doors were opened and closed, whether texts and calls were made while the cellphone was plugged into the infotainment system, as well as voice commands and web histories. But that boon for forensic investigators creates fear for privacy activists, who warn that the lack of information security baked into vehicles' computers poses a risk to consumers and who call for safeguards to be put in place.

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Baltimore Police back pilot program for surveillance planes, reviving controversial program

Baltimore Police Commissioner Michael Harrison said Friday he now supports a pilot program to fly three private surveillance planes over the city, reviving a controversial effort that had been shelved since it was revealed to have been used secretly three years ago. Read the full article at The Baltimore Sun.

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Senators introduce bipartisan bill restricting police use of facial recognition tech

Sens. Christopher Coons (D-Del.) and Mike Lee (R-Utah) introduced a bipartisan bill Tuesday requiring law enforcement to obtain court orders to use facial recognition technology for surveillance. The Facial Recognition Technology Warrant Act would limit surveillance warrants to 30 days and set rules to minimize the collection of information about individuals outside of the warrant’s scope. Read the full article at The Hill.

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Join EFF In Our Challenge to Ring Spokesperson Shaq Over Privacy Concerns

View on YouTube Share EFF’s “highlight videos” about how Ring’s law enforcement partnerships are endangering communities! You can help EFF dunk on surveillance by telling @Shaq to sit down with EFF’s privacy experts and learn more about how these Ring partnerships are #NothingButDragnet. Click below to tweet! Read the full article at The Electronic Fronteir Foundation.

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Police can keep Ring camera video forever and share with whomever they'd like

Police officers who download videos captured by homeowners' Ring doorbell cameras can keep them forever and share them with whomever they’d like without providing evidence of a crime, the Amazon-owned firm told a lawmaker this month. More than 600 police forces across the country have entered into partnerships with the camera giant, allowing them to quickly request and download video recorded by Ring’s motion-detecting, Internet-connected cameras inside and around Americans' homes.

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The Growing Transportation Surveillance Control Grid

A bill introduced in the U.S. House would create a real-time national driver surveillance program that would allow law enforcement to know anything and everything about a driver at the click of a button. But even if the bill never goes anywhere, the transportation surveillance system is already built – and growing. View on YouTube

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