Research

Report: THC Limits Not Correlated To Driving Impairment

The presence of THC in blood is not correlated with driving performance and is not a reliable indicator of psychomotor impairment, according to recommendations made by a state-appointed traffic safety task force. A report issued by the Michigan Impaired Driving Safety Commission finds that peak THC blood levels are not associated with maximal behavioral impairment and further finds that the compound’s influence upon driving performance varies significantly among individual consumers.

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Crashes increase when speed limits dip far below engineering recommendation

Speed limits set only five miles per hour below engineering recommendations produce a statistically significant decrease in total, fatal and injury crashes, and property-damage-only crashes, according to a group of Penn State researchers. “If (however) you lower the speed limit by 10, 15, 25 miles per hour, or more, drivers stop paying attention,” said Vikash Gayah, assistant professor of civil engineering. “We found there was an increase in fatal and injury crashes at locations with posted speed limits set 10 miles per hour or more below engineering recommendations.

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Red-light cameras don't reduce traffic accidents or improve public safety: analysis

Red-light cameras don’t reduce the number of traffic accidents or injuries at intersections where the devices are installed, according a new analysis by Case Western Reserve University. Read the full article at Phys.org.

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Red-light cameras don't reduce traffic accidents or improve public safety: analysis

“Red-light cameras don’t reduce the number of traffic accidents or injuries at intersections where the devices are installed, according a new analysis by Case Western Reserve University.” Read the full article at Phys.org.

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Federal Stats Show Alcohol, Seatbelt Use More Relevant Than Speed

Federal traffic fatality data released last week confirm that drinking, shifting demographics and seat belt use are the factors with the greatest impact on road safety. The new data show traffic fatalities continue to fall from the pre-recession peak of 1.46 deaths per hundred million miles traveled in 2005. Last year, the figure was 1.17. The preliminary 2017 number does represent an increase over the all-time low of 1.08 in 2014.

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