Ohio

Howland discontinued speed cameras July 1 after change in state law

The Howland Police Department ended its traffic- camera program July 1 in response to the new Ohio law that reduced state funding to government bodies using them. The legislation reduced the local government funding the government agency received by an amount equivalent to the fines they collected through a red-light or speed-camera program. Read the full article at The Vindicator.

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Dayton won't budge on traffic cams

New state restrictions on red-light and speed-detection camera programs that went into effect this week prompted the city of Trotwood to suspend its photo-enforcement program. But the city of Dayton remains defiant and has no plans to change its program despite the threat of financial penalties, claiming a preliminary injunction granted to Toledo blocks the new law statewide. Read the full article at The Lima News.

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Ohio Town Dragging Out Speed Camera Ticket Refunds

The village of New Miami, Ohio, has been fighting – and losing – a legal battle over its speed camera program since 2013. The state Court of Appeals and Supreme Court have already turned aside multiple procedural appeals. Those rulings all sided with Judge Michael A. Oster Jr, who deemed New Miami’s automated ticketing program unconstitutional because it gave vehicle owners no realistic opportunity to defend themselves after receiving a $180 ticket in the mail.

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Rossford one step closer to using handheld speeding cameras

Rossford City Council Monday held the first reading of an ordinance authorizing the city to enter into an agreement with Redflex Traffic Systems Inc. of Phoenix , which would introduce handheld speed-detection cameras. Read the full article at Toledo Blade.

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Move Over cameras tested in Cleveland after News 5 report

The camera mounts on a vehicle providing a 180-degree angle view, combining the camera, with speed and distance tracking, as well as proof the emergency lights were flashing making evidence gathering, a warning or a citation possible. Read the full article / watch the video at News 5 Cleveland.

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Ohio drivers are putting first responders at risk

First responders are in danger on the side of the roads because many drivers refuse to slow down, move over and follow the law when they see emergency lights flashing. […] A camera is behind that testing and evidence. It mounts on a vehicle, providing a 180-degree angle view. Combining the camera with speed and distance tracking as well as proof the emergency lights were flashing makes evidence gathering, a warning or a citation possible.

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Ohio Judge To Rule On Ohio Speed Camera Legality

Attorney Marc E. Dann is back in an Ohio courthouse in his challenge to the speed camera program in Girard. After attempting to make his argument before a federal judge earlier this year, Dann has recast his class action suit with a new legal theory that will meet its first test. On Wednesday, Trumbull County Common Pleas Judge Andrew D. Logan began considering the key question of whether the case should be allowed to proceed to trial.

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Norton, OH speed camera busts 9,352 drivers in two months, generating up to $1.1 million

A speed camera, used by Norton [Ohio] police in the I-76 construction zone, could generate $1.1 million for the city after more than 9,000 civil violations were mailed to drivers. Read the full article at News 5 Cleveland.

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Judge won't put the brakes on New Miami speed camera case

The five-year-old New Miami speed camera case will proceed to a judgment for the estimated 33,000 speeders who say they are owed $3.2 million due to the unconstitutional program. Judge Michael Oster announced today, after a two-hour hearing, that he was unswayed by recent decisions in other court jurisdictions and denied the village’s request that he reconsider a previous decision that found the program trampled speeders’ rights to due process.

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New Miami -- again -- asks court to toss the speed case lawsuit

New Miami is asking a judge to reconsider the constitutionality of its old speed camera program, or at least reduce its liability to $1.8 million instead of $3-plus million. Read the full article at Dayton Daily News.

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