Facial Recognition

How a Mark Cuban-Backed Facial Recognition Firm Pushed To Get Driver License Photo Data

Now, emails obtained through a public records request provide insight into how facial recognition companies attempt to strike deals with local law enforcement as well as gain access to sensitive data on local residents. The emails show how a firm backed by Shark Tank judge, Dallas Mavericks owner, and billionaire entrepreneur Mark Cuban pushed a local police department to try and gain access to state driver’s license photos to train its product.

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Facial Recognition Toll Booths Identify Drivers and Passengers, Notify Police Within Seconds

The state of New York is using facial recognition cameras to identify drivers and passengers at toll booths. Police are also testing facial recognition cameras that can identify people based on the shape of their ears! Read the full article at Activist Post.

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Hundreds of Police Departments Have Secretly Created Public Safety Watchlists Using Facial Recognition

To everyone that thinks secret watchlists are nothing more than a conspiracy theory, I give you, law enforcement’s secret public safety watchlists. The name of the company responsible for creating public safety watchlists – Suspect Technologies – should say it all but I digress. Read the full article at The Free Thought Project.

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Facial Recognition Software Wrongly Identifies 28 Lawmakers As Crime Suspects

Facial recognition software sold by Amazon mistakenly identified 28 members of Congress as people who had been arrested for crimes, the American Civil Liberties Union announced on Thursday. Read the full article at NPR.

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Big Brother Surveillance Begins: Cuomo Unveils Facial Scanning At New York Toll Plazas

“When it reads that license plate, it reads it for scofflaws . . . [but] the toll is almost the least significant contribution that this electronic equipment can actually perform,” Cuomo said at a press conference outside the Queens Midtown Tunnel. “We are now moving to facial-recognition technology, which takes it to a whole new level, where it can see the face of the person in the car and run that technology against databases… Because many times a person will turn their head when they see a security camera, so they are now experimenting with technology that just identifies a person by their ear, believe it or not,” he continued.

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Juggalos figured out how to beat facial recognition

“Welcome to a world where Juggalo makeup is your best shot at avoiding involuntary surveillance.” Read the full article at The Outline.

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Amazon urged not to sell facial recognition tool to police

Amazon’s decision to market a powerful face recognition tool to police is alarming privacy advocates, who say the tech giant’s reach could vastly accelerate a dystopian future in which camera-equipped officers can identify and track people in real time, whether they’re involved in crimes or not. Read the full article at ABC News.

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Springfield, IL to use facial recognition and speed cameras in work zones

This year, ISP is using a photo enforcement van on I-55 that takes video of license plates and who’s driving the car. If you’re caught speeding and your face matches the one on your license, you may be getting a ticket in the mail. Read the full article at Fox Illinois.

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Facial Recognition Is Now A Part Of The Driver's License Renewal Process

Forty-three of the 50 states are using some type of facial recognition technology. Visit your local DMV to renew your license, for example, your face is captured by a digital video camera. The physical and behavioral samples captured are then extracted in order to create and compare templates. In just a matter of seconds the technology determines if this is a new sample or matches an existing sample from a facial database.

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Real-Time Facial Recognition Is Available, But Will U.S. Police Buy It?

Do we really need this? Facial recognition accuracy rates have jumped dramatically in the last couple of years, making it feasible to monitor live video. China recently announced real-time facial recognition and similar systems are being tried in Russia, India and even the United Kingdom. For the moment, police in the U.S. seem to be holding off. Read the full article at NPR.

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